The Law and Society Association is an interdisciplinary scholarly organization committed to social scientific, interpretive, and historical analyses of  law across multiple social contexts.  For sociolegal scholars, law is not only the words of official documents.  Law also can be found in the diverse understandings and practices of people interacting within domains that law governs, in the claims that people make for legal redress of injustices, and in the coercive power exercised to enforce lawful order.  Sociolegal scholars also address evasions of law, resistance and defiance toward law, and alternatives to law in structuring social relations.

Deadline for Nominations: January 15th, 2019 

Deadline for Applications: February 1st, 2019

The Law and Society Association seeks a new Book Review Editor for the Law & Society Review. The appointment is for three years, and includes an ex-officio appointment to the Board of Trustees of the Law and Society Association. The Book Review Editor will be expected to begin work starting in September 2019 and serve a three-year term.  The Association is eager to receive nominations and applications for this position. 

The LSA Book Review Editor will have a keen eye for significant law and society work, an appreciation of the theoretical and methodological breadth of law and society scholarship, a willingness to tap into networks of conscientious folks who would write interesting reviews from a variety of perspectives, a creative approach to conceptualizing and generating reviews, the ability to meet deadlines, and the interest in and availability to devote time to this important task.  The Book Review Editor is expected to maintain active membership in the Association during their term.  

Duties of the Book Review Editor include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Receive books proposed for review (mainly from publishers)
  • Decide which books are most appropriate for review in LSR
  • Recruit reviewers of these books and send them the book to review 
  • Communicate to reviewers your expectations in terms of length, deadline, and other guidelines
  • Provide feedback to reviewers as needed to obtain publishable reviews
  • Select reviews to be published in each issue
  • Work with the LSR Managing Editor to submit reviews to the journal on time and within page/item allowance for each issue
  • Prepare a report in early December for the Executive Committee and late April for the Trustees, summarizing the reviews you have generated      and noting any policy issues you would like to raise

Interested parties may apply by submitting a curriculum vitae and letter of interest by 1 February 2019.

In addition, the Search Committee encourages nominations for the position. Nominations should be made as soon as possible and no later than 15 January 2019.  Nominations should include the nominee’s e-mail and mailing addresses, title, and a brief statement of the nominee’s qualifications for the position. Any other information in support of the nomination, for example, a CV, is helpful. The committee will contact the nominee directly to make sure that they are willing to serve and ask for additional support materials as needed. 

Those interested in learning more about the position may contact the current book review editor, Jennifer Balint, at Jennifer Balint jbalint@unimelb.edu.au

Established in 1996 as the LSA Book Award, and re-named in memory of Herbert Jacob, past President of LSA, the competition is open to books from all fields of, and approaches to, law and society scholarship—excluding only works of socio-legal history, which are considered for the Hurst Prize.


Herbert Jacob was the founder of the first internet book review in the field, Law and Politics Book Review. He was a creative, energetic scholar who took on a wide variety of questions and issues and a warm human being whose own work has been a major contribution to the field of law and society. The award is intended to recognize new, outstanding work in law and society scholarship.

Textbooks, casebooks, and edited collections are not eligible for the award, but monographs will be considered. Nominations are accepted from all aspects of the field and any country of origin and may include first books of young scholars and books that are capstones of long careers in law and society research and publication. Nominators must be a current LSA member (will be verified). Self nominations are accepted.

The responsibility of ensuring that a work is submitted for the most appropriate book prize rests with the nominator. As a rule of thumb, books that have a significant historical focus should be directed to the Hurst Prize, while other works of socio-legal scholarship should be directed to the Jacob Prize.  A book submitted for both prizes may end up being considered for neither.

The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • To stress the restriction stated above, books eligible for the Jacob Prize may be from any field of socio-legal scholarship except history; books with a significant historical focus should be submitted instead to the Association’s Hurst Prize. 
  • Only one single-authored work by the same author in a given year will be accepted. Two works by the same author will be accepted if one or both works are jointly authored.
  • Books must be published in English, or be English translations of original works. 
  • Books submitted must have a publication date during the calendar year prior to the award ceremony.
  • Page proofs may be sent if the book will be published soon with the proper year’s date.
  • A letter of support from the nominator, including a synopsis of the book.
  • Only nominations from an LSA member will be considered. Self-nominations are accepted.
  • Copies of the book are required to be sent directly to the Herbert Jacob Book Prize Committee Members. Addresses will be provided after the nomination is submitted.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

In the spirit of Willard Hurst's own work, the Hurst Prize is given to the best work in socio-legal history. The field of socio-legal history is broadly defined to include the history of interrelationships between law and social, economic, and political change; the history of functions and impact of legal agencies, legislative and administrative as well as judicial; the social history of the legal profession; and similar topics. Nominators must be a current LSA member (will be verified). Self-nominations are accepted.


Textbooks, casebooks, and edited collections are not eligible for the award, but monographs will be considered. The Association seeks studies in legal history that explore the relationship between law and society or illuminate the use, function, and cultural meaning of law and society. The Association discourages submission of purely doctrinal studies in the evolution of appellate case law.

The responsibility of ensuring that a work is submitted for the most appropriate book prize rests with the nominator. As a rule of thumb, books that have a significant historical focus should be directed to the Hurst Prize, while other works of socio-legal scholarship should be directed to the Jacob Prize.  A book submitted for both prizes may end up being considered for neither.
The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • Books must be published in English, or be English translations of original works. 
  • Books submitted must have a publication date during the calendar year prior to the award ceremony.
  • Page proofs may be sent if the book will be published soon with the proper year’s date.
  • Only one single-authored work by the same author in a given year will be accepted. Two works by the same author will be accepted if one or both works are jointly authored.
  • A letter of support from the nominator, including a synopsis of the book.
  • Submissions must be nominated by a current LSA member. Self-nominations are accepted.
  • Copies of the book are required to be sent directly to the J. Willard Hurst Book Prize Committee Members. Addresses will be provided after the nomination is submitted.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

The Harry J. Kalven, Jr. Award is awarded by the Law and Society Association for "empirical scholarship that has contributed most effectively to the advancement of research in law and society." Nominations are open to all forms of law and society scholarship, and from any country of origin, although copies submitted to the committee must be in English.

It is not a book award, nor is it a career achievement award, but is given in recognition of a body of scholarly work, including some portion of work having been completed within the past few years. Self-nominations are accepted - if self nominating, please include a statement of why you feel you deserve the award in place of the letter of support.

The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • A letter of support from the nominator
  • The candidate’s curriculum vitae
  • 1 of 2 additional letters of support will be accepted, but are not required.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

The John Hope Franklin Prize was established in 2010 by the Law and Society Association to recognize exceptional scholarship in the field of Race, Racism and the Law. The award is awarded annually and is named for John Hope Franklin, a professor of history and law whose interdisciplinary research documented the history of racism and its effects, whose scholarship had both national and international influence, and whose commitments to intellectual freedom, professional service, and civic activism were resolute.

The Franklin Prize is awarded for an article published in the two calendar years prior to the award year. The competition is open to all forms of law and society scholarship, to authors at any stage of their careers, and to authors from any country of origin. Articles may be published in any scholarly journal, including socio-legal journals, journals in other disciplines, and law reviews, or may be a chapter in a book volume. Co-authored articles, and self-nominations, may be submitted for consideration.

While there is no limit on the number of articles one may nominate, an article may not be considered for the John Hope Franklin Prize and another LSA award. The decision in determining whether an article should be submitted for consideration for the Franklin Prize, rather than another LSA award, rests with the article’s nominator in consultation with the author.

The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • Article copies submitted to the committee must be in English.
  • The article must have a publication date within the two calendar years prior to the awards ceremony. Articles will be considered only once during the two-year period of eligibility.
  • Only one single-authored work by the same author in a given year will be accepted. Two works by the same author will be accepted if one or both works are jointly authored.
  • A letter of support from the nominator, including an abstract of the article.
  • The full article, including full bibliographic citation.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

The Law and Society Association Article Prize, recognizes exceptional scholarship in socio-legal studies for a journal article or chapter in an edited book. Articles may be published in any scholarly journal, including socio-legal journals, journals in other disciplines, and law reviews. Self-nominations are accepted.

The competition is open to all forms of law and society scholarship, to authors at any stage of their careers, and to authors from any country of origin.

The award carries cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • Article copies submitted to the committee must be in English.
  • Only one single-authored work by the same author in a given year will be accepted. Two works by the same author will be accepted if one or both works are jointly authored.
  • The article must have a publication date within the two calendar years prior to the awards ceremony. Articles will only be considered once within the two-year period of eligibility.
  • A letter of support from the nominator (or personal statement, if self-nominating), including an abstract of the article.
  • The full article, including full bibliographic citation.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

The Law and Society Association International Prize is offered to a scholar, normally in residence outside the United States, in recognition of significant contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the field of law and society.
It is not a book award, nor is it a career achievement award, but is given in recognition of a body of scholarly work, including some portion of the work should that has been completed within the past few years, and self-nominations are accepted.

The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • Normally offered to a scholar in residence outside the United States
  • A letter of support from the nominator
  • The candidate’s curriculum vitae
  • 1 or 2 additional letters of support will be accepted, but are not required.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

The Law and Society Association presents one award to the dissertation that best represents outstanding work in law and society research. The subject matter should be in the interdisciplinary tradition of law and society research, and should reflect the style of articles that appear in the Law & Society Review, such as work that examines law in culture and society, including interpretive, historical, social-scientific, and jurisprudential scholarship.


The selection committee welcomes international submissions (in English).

The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • The dissertation must have been filed with the institution of higher education (U.S or non-U.S) during the calendar year prior to the award ceremony.
  • One letter of nomination from a regular member of the Law and Society Association. No self-nominations or student-member nominations are accepted.
  • The full dissertation in English; translations from other languages into English are welcome.
  • An abstract of the dissertation, also in English.

 

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format. 


The Law and Society Association presents one award to the graduate student paper that best represents outstanding law and society research. The subject matter should be in the interdisciplinary tradition of law and society research, and should reflect the style of articles that appear in the Law & Society Review, such as work that examines law in culture and society, including interpretative, historical, social-scientific, and jurisprudential scholarship.


The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • Only non-student members of the Law and Society Association may make nominations for the Graduate Student Award. No self-nominations are accepted.
  • The paper must have been submitted within the two calendar years prior to the awards ceremony by a matriculated graduate or graduate professional student at any U.S. or non-U.S. institution of higher education. Papers originally written for coursework within this same time period and subsequently published are still eligible for nomination. Papers are only considered once within the two-year period of eligibility.
  • No instructor may nominate more than two student papers for the award.
  • Only one single-authored work by the same author in a given year will be accepted. Two works by the same author will be accepted if one or both works are jointly authored.
  • In submitting the paper for award consideration, the nominator must include the date and title of the course for which the paper was written.
  • Submissions must be in English; translations from other languages into English are welcome.
  • The paper must be double-spaced; may not exceed 18,000 words in length, including notes and references; and must be in a minimum of 12 point font.
  • Nominators must include a letter of support describing the merits of the student paper they are submitting.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

The Law and Society Association presents one award to the undergraduate student paper that best represents outstanding law and society research. The subject matter should be in the interdisciplinary tradition of law and society research, and should reflect the style of articles that appear in the Law & Society Review, such as work that examines law in culture and society, including interpretative, historical, social-scientific, and jurisprudential scholarship.

The award carries a cash prize of $500.

Nominations require: 

  • Only regular LSA members and graduate student LSA members who have received the nominated papers while working as lecturers or teaching assistants may nominate papers for the Undergraduate Student Award. No self-nominations are accepted.
  • No instructor may nominate more than two student papers for the award.
  • Only one single-authored work by the same author in a given year will be accepted. Two works by the same author will be accepted if one or both works are jointly authored.
  • The paper must have been submitted within the two calendar years prior to the awards ceremony by a matriculated undergraduate student at any U.S. or non-U.S. institution of higher education including two-year community colleges. Papers originally written for a class within this same time period and subsequently published are still eligible. Papers are only considered once within the two-year period of eligibility.
  • In submitting the paper for award consideration, the nominator must include the date and title of the course for which the paper was written.
  • Submissions must be in English; translations from other languages into English are welcome.
  • The paper must be double-spaced; may not exceed 18,000 words in length, including notes and references; and must be in a minimum of 12 point font.
  • Nominators must include a letter of support describing the merits of the student paper they are submitting.

All supporting documents must be submitted in English and be in .DOC, .RTF, or .PDF format.

Thank you for submitting your teaching materials to the Law and Society Association Teaching Materials Repository, where LSA is accepting submissions for syllabi, assignments, in-class activities, and teaching materials for a wide range of courses. Please use the following form to provide the information we need to upload your materials.

If the system does not recognize your email address, then you will need to create a new account.  This is a different system than our membership, registration or abstract submission system.

Law and Society Association